Q&A: I Am Interested In The Study Of Sex

If you’re curious about working as a sex researcher, you can approach the study of sex from any number of disciplines including public health, psychology, education, sociology, anthropology, medicine, film studies, history, women’s studies, gender studies, telecommunications, biology, or whatever else you can dream of.

Q&A: I Can’t Orgasm When I Masturbate In Front Of My Boyfriend

Women’s experiences of pleasure and orgasm often change throughout life, in response to pregnancy, birth, health conditions, menopause, stress, and aging. Learning to talk about sexuality and how to make sex feel better for both of you will better situate you both for a lifetime of sexual enjoyment and exploration.

Q&A: Why Does My Girlfriend Feel Bad After We Have Sex?

The experience of sexual pleasure can also tap into people’s brain chemistry in ways that, as scientists, we don’t fully understand yet. For example, I have heard, from several people who describe sadness associated with sex for reasons they don’t understand.

Q&A: Does Depression Contribute To Erectile Problems?

Researchers have found that even mild depression can interfere with men’s and women’s sexual experiences. Depression can contribute to problems with desire, erections and ease of orgasm. When people feel depressed, they may more easily allow distracting thoughts to get in the way of their arousal, which can contribute to erectile problems.