Q&A: My Girlfriend’s Vagina Becomes Sensitive After Orgasm

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QUESTION: Whenever I give my girlfriend and orgasm she always tells me to stop because her vagina becomes too sensitive to touch. Sometimes she even tells me it hurts. Is this normal? Should we be concerned?

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Although not all women become very sensitive after orgasm, some do. Some women find that their clitoris becomes extremely sensitive following orgasm, or else their vagina or other parts of their vulva may become sensitive.

Sexual excitement and orgasm are full of different bodily changes and these sensations can change from the excitement phase to the orgasm and post-orgasm phase.

Talk To Your Girlfriend

If your girlfriend finds that she is very sensitive, perhaps you two can talk and find different ways of having sex that you both find enjoyable. Perhaps sometimes you can have sex the way that you often do now, and if she is too sensitive to go on, you can stop with intercourse and continue on to something else.

Other times you might try other means of pleasure. Perhaps sometimes you could have an orgasm first and then perform oral sex on her, or stimulate her with your fingers or in other ways that feel good to her.

Alternatively, she could have an orgasm through intercourse, you could move on to kissing and cuddling and other forms of sex play for several minutes, and then try intercourse again after a longer period of time. You may even try adding lubricant prior to entering her again.

That’s because when a woman is very aroused, her lubrication often continues to build. But after orgasm, many women do not continue to produce much lubrication, if any at all. Adding some store-bought lubricant may help to make sex more comfortable and pleasurable for her.

Not Necessarily A Cause For Concern

Again, though not all women share this experience, some do, and so in and of itself it is not necessarily a reason to think that something may be wrong. However, if you or your girlfriend would like to ask a healthcare provider about this, we would strongly encourage you to do so – especially because it is related to pain and discomfort for her, and it may feel reassuring or be important for her to mention this to her healthcare provider.

Dr. Debby Herbenick (M.P.H., Ph.D.)

is a sexual health educator at The Kinsey Institute, Associate Director of the Center for Sexual Health Promotion at Indiana University and author of several books including Sex Made Easy and Because It Feels Good: A Woman's Guide to Sexual Pleasure and Satisfaction.
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