Q&A: Can I Get Pregnant If A Guy Pulls Out Before He Ejaculates?

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QUESTION: Can I get pregnant if a guy pulls out of me just before he comes, wipes it off and squeezes out any leftovers, and then he sticks it back in me?

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Photo: MeganDarling (flickr.com)

If you are both feeling ready to have sex, you could choose to use a reliable method of birth control such as a condom or hormonal birth control such as the birth control pill, patch or ring.

Affirmative Pregnancy Warning

Yes, from what you describe, it would technically be possible to become pregnant from having unprotected sex with a man who has just come, wiped off his penis and then put his penis back inside your vagina.

This is because even if he squeezed what he thought was the rest of his semen out of his penis and wiped it on his towel or hand, he may still have some semen further down his urethra that he would not have been able to squeeze out.

Getting Rid of Semen

Men cannot reliably squeeze all of their semen out of their penis. Sometimes it trickles out a few moments later.

Also, there may be sperm that are further down and then, when he is inside you and gets aroused again, his pre-ejaculatory fluids may sweep up the sperm several minutes later, or even longer, and carry it outside his body and into your vagina.

Avoid Pregnancy

If you do not want to become pregnant, you have several options. You could abstain from sexual activity with your partner altogether.

Or you could engage in sex play with your partner but only the types of sex play that do not pose a pregnancy risk, such as making out and touching each others’ genitals with your hands or having dry sex with both of your clothes on.

Reliable Birth Control

Or, if you are both feeling ready to have sex, then you could have sex with each other but choose to use a reliable method of birth control such as a condom or hormonal birth control such as the birth control pill, patch or ring.

More Information

You can learn more about these methods of birth control by reading Our Bodies, Ourselves or The Guide to Getting It On.

Planned Parenthood also has extensive information about birth control methods, condoms and preventing pregnancy. Each of these resources also has information about things you can do to increase your chances of becoming pregnant if that is something that you and your partner are interested in doing together.

Dr. Debby Herbenick (M.P.H., Ph.D.)

is a sexual health educator at The Kinsey Institute, Associate Director of the Center for Sexual Health Promotion at Indiana University and author of several books including Sex Made Easy and Because It Feels Good: A Woman's Guide to Sexual Pleasure and Satisfaction.
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