Kinsey Institute In The News This Week

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Natalie sums up the past week of news featuring the Kinsey Institute's staff including Dr. Stephanie Sanders in a Fox article and Jenny Bass on Salon.com

humansex_slide

Photo: Eric Dykstra

Human sexuality studies from the slide projector perspective.

A while back I signed for Google News updates. This means that anytime the phrases “sexual health,” “Kinsey Institute,” “sexuality,” or “Kinsey” pop up in a news story, I get a daily digest e-mail about it. I think it helps me keep up with current news stories, important political actions on sexuality and sexual health, and things of this nature. Sometimes, though, it can be surprisingly entertaining (and a bit scary, in the case of this first news update).

Hot Sauce In A Condom?

First up, a story that might get your private parts tingling – in a very bad way. Our illustrious Communications Director, Jenny, was quoted in a Salon.com column about the practice of putting hot sauce inside a condom. What? You read that right. The idea here is that there are hoards of manipulative women out there trying to force marriage by taking the “contents” of a used condom and putting them in their vagina after sex, theoretically to induce pregnancy.

First of all, this is probably one of the worst ways to head into a marriage – with a baby on the way, forcefully and with huge about of lies and deceit. So we’re all on the same page with that. So, what’s a guy to do? Apparently, either was the condom out or put hot sauce in it so the Evil Woman “learns her lesson” with a searing pain of hot sauce ejaculate if she tries to put in herself.

Yikes! Both behaviors are deplorable in their own ways and I honestly never thought I’d read about the mixing of hot sauce and condoms in such a way. I hope that no one ever has to stoop to either of these behaviors and can start having some real, adult conversations about marriage and pregnancy before it ever gets to this (scary) step.

Check out the Salon.com article to see how the columnist responds to the reader’s question about this situation Jenny’s contributions to the conversation, my favorite being:

Also, [Jenny] said — and this has the quality of wry understatement — there is a strong possibility of “permanent damage to the relationship.”

Birth Control And Sexual Satisfaction

The Kinsey Institute is also getting some press on the FOXSexpert article “10 Sex Findings You Won’t Believe” about Dr. Stephanie Sanders research about birth control and sexual satisfaction. You can read more about Dr. Sanders work with other sex researchers around birth control here.

The rest of the list is a solid summary of some good research articles around sex and sexuality. Props to Dr. Yvonne Fulbright who wrote the article for presenting sex-positive research findings to the masses in an engaging way.

Dr. Julia Heiman on Sirius Radio

Next up in our news section, Kinsey Institute Director, Dr. Julia Heiman will be the guest on Sirius Radio’s Doctor Radio program on Monday (March 2nd) at noon. You can sign up for a free 3 day trial and listen online. It is a call-in program about sexual health. See details below.

Dr. Heiman will be speaking with Dr. Virginia Sadock, the host of the program, about a number of issues:

  • Dr. Heiman’s career and the work she’s doing at the Kinsey Institute.
  • How the Kinsey Institute has evolved and what it wants to focus on going forward
  • Her book “Becoming Orgasmic”
  • Why research tends to focus on abnormal or atypical sexual patters rather than “normal” sexuality (just what is”normal”?)
  • How the U.S. needs to address the issues of teen pregnancy and STDs

Sex-Positive Events At Catholic Colleges

Finally, some good news on the sexual literacy and education fronts with a series of Catholic colleges hosting sex-positive events around the beginning of Lent, traditionally a time of more solemn religious observance.

The sexual literacy advocate in me is happy to hear that these colleges are recognizing the value in educating students on the varieties of sexual expression and sexual health issues facing their community.

A way-to-go shout to the organizers of these events at Georgetown, Loyola Chicago, and Seattle University.

Natalie Ingraham (M.P.H.)

is a recent graduate of Indiana University and is now pursuing a Ph.D. in Medical Sociology at University of California San Francisco.
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