Q&A: Hand Job, Fingering, And Pregnancy Risk

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QUESTION: After giving my boyfriend a hand job, I had semen on my hand. 45 minutes later, I washed my hands with soap and water and then I fingered myself. Even though I washed my hands, is there still a pregnancy risk?

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Washing Hands

Photo: Arlington County (flickr.com)

If you got semen on your hand, but washed your hands well with soap and water, then you likely cleared all of the semen off of your hands.

The Power of Soap and Water

Fortunately, semen does not last forever.

If you got semen on your hand, but washed your hands well with soap and water, then you likely cleared all of the semen off of your hands. Then, even if you fingered yourself or engaged in other types of sex play, you would have been unlikely to have gotten any semen on your body because any semen that was on your hands likely got washed down the drain.

Preventing Pregnancy

If you are concerned about pregnancy risk, you might want to look into birth control options to see if there is one that is right for you. If you and your boyfriend are not having intercourse and are definitely not planning on having intercourse, then your sole form of birth control may be keeping his penis and his semen away from your vagina.

However, if your sex play sometimes evolves into dry humping or rubbing your genitals together somewhat, then you might consider other forms of birth control that would offer you more protection against pregnancy or sexually transmissible infections, or STIs.

Condoms are an excellent form of birth control and they also reduce the risk of some but not all STIs. The birth control pill, patch and ring are hormonal types of birth control that offer effective methods of birth control but do not prevent STIs.

More Information

You can learn more about birth control methods and correct use of condoms from Planned Parenthood. You can learn about STIs on their web site as well as on the web site of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Finally, if you have questions about which birth control method might be a good choice for you and your boyfriend – if or when you decide to use one or more methods – ask your healthcare provider for additional information.

Dr. Debby Herbenick (M.P.H., Ph.D.)

is a sexual health educator at The Kinsey Institute, Associate Director of the Center for Sexual Health Promotion at Indiana University and author of several books including Sex Made Easy and Because It Feels Good: A Woman's Guide to Sexual Pleasure and Satisfaction.
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