Q&A: Girlfriend Can’t Take Hormones & Bleeds During Sex

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QUESTION: My girlfriend is 67 and had not had sex in 8 years until she met me. For the first year or so we had a great sex life. Now she bleeds after we have sex. She has no cervix, and had a hysterectomy and can't take hormones. What could cause her bleeding? We use a lubricant and are still very much wanting to be active. Any ideas?

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Photo: saxen4u (Flickr)

If your girlfriend is open to it, she might consider using a vaginal moisturizer a few times a week, or as recommended by her healthcare provider, to help maintain vaginal wetness and comfort.

There are many reasons why a woman may experience vaginal bleeding during or after sex. Some of the reasons are due to vaginal dryness.

Even if you’re using a lubricant, your girlfriend may experience more chronic vaginal dryness as a result of her age, not taking hormones and having had a hysterectomy.

You didn’t mention whether her doctor removed her ovaries as part of her hysterectomy, or how old she was when she had her hysterectomy, but if her ovaries were removed at a younger age that may mean that she has been without much estrogen for a very long time.

Estrogen contributes to vaginal lubrication and it also helps keep the vagina and vulva flexible and strong.

Fortunately there are some vaginal moisturizer that don’t contain hormones.

If your girlfriend is open to it, she might consider using a vaginal moisturizer a few times a week, or as recommended by her healthcare provider, to help maintain vaginal wetness and comfort.

Check In With A Doctor

I would highly recommend that she check in with her healthcare provider for recommendations as well as to make sure that there are no other identifiable causes of the bleeding that she is experiencing.

As mentioned, the bleeding may be occurring as a result of vaginal dryness, which could make her more prone to developing small vaginal tears or cuts during sex.

But it’s also possible, though more rare, that more serious health issues – including cancer – is at the root of vaginal bleeding. As such, it is very important for her to check in with her healthcare provider and mention the vaginal bleeding.

You and she can learn more about vaginal health and wellness, including the use of lubricants and moisturizers, in The V Book: A Doctor’s Guide to Vulvovaginal Health.

Next Question: Average Penis Size: Do I Have The Size To Get The Job Done?

My girlfriend had a boyfriend that had a penis that was a lot larger than mine. They dated for two years. My penis is six inches long and when we have sex I don’t know if I am pleasing her. Do I have the size to get the job done?

Read Dr. Debby Herbenick’s response.

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Dr. Debby Herbenick (M.P.H., Ph.D.)

is a sexual health educator at The Kinsey Institute, Associate Director of the Center for Sexual Health Promotion at Indiana University and author of several books including Sex Made Easy and Because It Feels Good: A Woman's Guide to Sexual Pleasure and Satisfaction.
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