Q&A: I Bled During Fingering. Should I Be Concerned?

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QUESTION: My boyfriend and I were messing around and it turned into fingering. Things got a little rough and all of a sudden I felt a sharp pain and he noticed blood. I'm sore and it burns a little to urinate. Should I be concerned?

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Blood-Trail

Photo: paulieparker (flickr.com)

Sometimes women get cuts on parts of their vulva, the perineum, or the area around the clitoris. Often, cuts that result from sex play are quite small and heal well on their own.

Cuts Happen, Cuts Heal

Often, small vaginal cuts heal within about 1-3 days, so having small amounts of vaginal bleeding a few hours after getting cut during sex is not unusual. However, any time that more moderate or large amounts of blood are lost, or if you experience ongoing discomfort or pain associated with sex or possible tearing, it’s wise to check in with a healthcare provider.

Sometimes women get cuts on parts of their vulva, such as on the labia (which are also called the vaginal lips), the perineum or the area around the clitoris.

Other times women get cut internally, inside the vaginal canal. Often, cuts that result from sex play or intercourse are quite small and heal well on their own. Occasionally, though, vaginal or vulvar cuts may require stitches or other medical attention for proper healing.

If the bleeding continues, if you continue to experience pain or discomfort, or if you have additional questions about your personal health, please check in with your healthcare provider.

Ease and Comfort

To reduce the risk of vaginal or vulvar cuts in the future, you may want to engage in less vigorous fingering and possibly use a water-based or silicone-based lubricant, which can help to reduce friction. Lubricant can be applied to your partner’s fingers, to your vaginal opening, or to both parts.

In addition, some women find it more comfortable to “sit” on their partner’s finger so that they can maintain control over the pace and roughness of fingering.

More Information

To learn more about a variety of types of sex play, and ways to engage in it more safely, check out Because It Feels Good, Moregasm or The Good Vibrations Guide to Sex.

Dr. Debby Herbenick (M.P.H., Ph.D.)

is a sexual health educator at The Kinsey Institute, Associate Director of the Center for Sexual Health Promotion at Indiana University and author of several books including Sex Made Easy and Because It Feels Good: A Woman's Guide to Sexual Pleasure and Satisfaction.
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